Art students bring ‘The Odd and Imperfect’ to 208 Garfield

Posted on Apr 9 2014 - 9:04am by Alison Haywood

By Una Tingvik Haave, A&E Writer

Some not-so-perfect art has brightened PLU’s outpost restaurant 208 Garfield since last Friday. Seniors Rachel Teahan and Kailey McEvilly painted the art for the show, which is ending today.

Tacoma-area residents Sarah Mohr, left, and Stacey Lowrance, right, sit in front of The Odd and Imperfect fine art exhibit at 208 Garfield as they plan an eighth-grade graduation party. The art exhibit ran through April 11. Photo by Jesse Major.

Tacoma-area residents Sarah Mohr, left, and Stacey Lowrance, right, sit in front of The Odd and Imperfect fine art exhibit at 208 Garfield as they plan an eighth-grade graduation party. The art exhibit ran through April 11. Photo by Jesse Major.

Titled “The Odd and Imperfect,” the art show reflects the women’s personalities as well as their art style.

“Kailey [McEvilly] and I were sort of brainstorming different ideas,” Teahan said, “and we didn’t want it super serious, because that’s not how we are in general.”

McEvilly said she and Teahan have a corky style of art.

“Generally it’s a little bit more abstract — it’s less about perfection, and reaching that perfection that some artists strive for,” McEvilly said. “I think there’s a lot of value in imperfections.”

Both students said they were excited to share their not-so-perfect artworks with the public and especially excited to get the opportunity to share them in a venue like 208 Garfield.

“It has more of a relaxed atmosphere,” Teahan said, comparing it to the Senior Exhibition that will feature some of Teahan and McEvilly’s work April 23.

The two also said they liked the fact that they were able to display their art off-campus.

“We wanted to do sort of a solo show that would give us a little bit more exposure, get the community a little involved and hopefully get more people to come to the senior show, which comes up at the end of the month,” McEvilly said.

Both Teahan and McEvilly said they believe their art is unique and original, describing it as “less mainstream” and “more abstract and less apparent as to what their meaning is” than a lot of the art that is out there right now.

Both young and old attended the opening of the art show.

“It’s a nice thing for 208 to get people in here,” McEvilly said.

Video by Storm Gerlock, General Manager