LuteFit encourages exercise with 5k color run

Posted on May 7 2014 - 2:22am by Alison Haywood, A&E Editor

By Tahnayee Clendinen, A&E Writer

Those in white tees had better be prepared, because May 16, the annual LuteFit Color Run will be happening on lower campus.

Students smile as volunteers toss colorful powder at them during the 2013 Lute Loop Color Run. LuteFit has held the non-competitive 5k run for several years now to have fun and celebrate physical fitness, but last year’s Lute Loop was the first color run in PLU’s history. Photo courtesy of Quinn Huelsbeck.

Students smile as volunteers toss colorful powder at them during the 2013 Lute Loop Color Run. LuteFit has held the non-competitive 5k run for several years now to have fun and celebrate physical fitness, but last year’s Lute Loop was the first color run in PLU’s history. Photo courtesy of Quinn Huelsbeck.

Students and faculty alike can participate in the annual event. Volunteers throw cornstarch-based colorful powder at the participants as they run or walk the route. This gives the run a literal and figurative splash of color, which is one of the main attractions of the run.

“The color is edible,” Ross McLeod, a health educator, said. “But we don’t recommend it.”

Participants usually show up dressed in plain white shirts. Some have been known to rock a tutu, while others don their basketball shorts for the event.

“I was considering wearing a tutu,” first-year Christine Consulta said. “If I can’t find one in time, I will just wear white basketball shorts and get all colored up.”

The route will begin at the track and then go around campus. There will be a warm-up at 4:30 p.m. and the actual run will begin at 4:45 p.m. Volunteers will throw color at three spots on the track, two spots around campus and a final throw at the finish line.

While the powdered-paint-throwing is one of the main attractions, it is not the only reason many come out to participate in the event.

“I love everything about it,” first-year Casey Kaku said. “The people, paint — everything.”

For those who are concerned about their fitness levels, the Color Run has taken this in to account. When taking part in the festivities, Color Run organizers encourage students and faculty to just do their best, whether they are running or walking around the track. It is because of this in fact, that many people have signed up to participate.

“I haven’t gone for a run longer than two or so miles in a while,” sophomore Jasmine Hendricks said. “So it will be nice to still participate when I get tired or need to take a break by walking.”

Ray Lader, the associate director for Student Rights and Responsibilities, said the Color Run will not be a competitive run.

“It’s a fun run,” Lader said. “There are runs that are competitive, but this isn’t one of them. We want everyone to have a good time.”

The Color Run also serves as a mental health break for students. Because the Color Run will be happening on a Friday, some students will welcome the relief.

“I am going to be back and forth doing presentations and studying for finals that week,” first-year Magdiel Habila said. “So it will be nice to get outside in the fresh air and not be stressing for a bit.”

Whether participants come to relieve stress, get covered in paint or to push their physical boundaries, the Color Run aims to include all who wish to be a part of the festivities.

“I can’t really think of a reason not to go the Color Run,” Kaku said.

Those wanting to take part in the Color Run should go online to register. According to the Pacific Lutheran University website, those who registered before April 18 and completed their waivers by April 25 will receive a free Color Run t-shirt. Registration for the run is free.

So far, 300 people have registered, but Lader said he expects more to register by the May 3 deadline.

“It’s free and fun,” Habila said. “What else could you want?”

Reland Tuomi contributed to this article.