Copy Editor Hannah Soltis      PHOTO BY MCKENNA MORIN

HANNAH SOLTIS; Copy Editor; soltishe@plu.edu

A new multi-faith meditation and prayer space was opened on Sept. 8 in Anderson University Center 205.

The goal for the space is to be more inclusive to all religious traditions, and is a part of Pacific Lutheran University’s dedication to diversity, justice and sustainability (DJS). In the past, religious spaces on campus have been either explicitly or implicitly Christian, which left many students with no designated place on campus for reflection or prayer. The new space is open to all students, regardless of religious belief or lack thereof, and was built through the DJS fund.

University Pastor Reverend Jen Rude said she hopes it is “a space where members of the PLU community can find peace and grounding in the midst of a hectic school and work environment.”

The space includes an educational binder for people with questions about different faiths, as well as a comment and suggestion notebook for visitors to give their input. It is accessible to anyone with a LuteCard during the hours the AUC is open.

Senior Paris Franklin, who is Jewish, said, “I think that it’s very useful to have a space like this for students of all faiths. I know for me personally, praying in a church has always been a source of anxiety because I’m afraid of being labelled as a bad Jew or disappointing my family.”

By dedicating the space to all faiths, no one has to feel left out. Franklin said, “Having a space designed for people of multiple faiths is appealing.”

Rude pointed out, “It’s a work in progress,” but she hopes “this space and our growing interfaith work on campus will contribute to deeper engagement across difference and as a way to continue to live our DJS values.

The new space is open to all students, regardless of religious belief or lack thereof, and was built through the DJS fund.

University Pastor Reverend Jen Rude said she hopes it is “a space where members of the PLU community can find peace and grounding in the midst of a hectic school and work environment.”

The space includes an educational binder for people with questions about different faiths, as well as a comment and suggestion notebook for visitors to give their input.

Senior Paris Franklin, who is Jewish, said, “I think that it’s very useful to have a space like this for students of all faiths. I know for me personally, praying in a church has always been a source of anxiety because I’m afraid of being labelled as a bad Jew or disappointing my family.” By dedicating the space to all faiths, no one has to feel left out. Franklin said, “Having a space designed for people of multiple faiths is appealing.”

Rude pointed out, “It’s a work in progress,” but she hopes “this space and our growing interfaith work on campus will contribute to deeper engagement across difference and as a way to continue to live our DJS values.” ◼︎

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